Clinical

Since I started in chiropractic about 40 years ago, I have been troubled by the vertebral subluxation. It's not that I question whether subluxations exist.  The problem is that I can feel subluxations, but I don't understand what is going on and why they happen.
Throughout many years as a practising chiropractor, I have found myself frustrated with patients who have experienced long term back and leg pain, with no relief from my approach. I utilize various chiropractic techniques and include many mechanical and PEMF physical therapies that seemed to be beneficial in most spinal conditions, but not with the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis.
In part one of this series, I presented a general introduction to the complex topic of “pain with movement” disorders was provided with a detailed discussion of the first contributor to a pain syndrome, i.e. the activity of local nociceptors with receptor fields on dermatomal, myotomal and sclerotomal tissues. An important caveat was provided associated with this idea – the well-known neurofunctional fact that activity of local nociceptors does not necessarily require tissue damage.
According to the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), pain is defined as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.”
These days, many chiropractors are adjusting patients suffering from the effects of overusing their various electronic devices. Everywhere we go, people are engaged with their phones. Some seem completely unable to put the device away.
Too often, chiropractors label a patient’s condition in a way that does not provide specific information about the nature of their dysfunction. Terms like bursitis, tennis elbow, jumpers knee  – even more general terms like low back pain, neck pain, and sciatica do little to define the nature of the injury.
Last month, a rather elderly woman presented with a bad case of low back pain.
If you ask an aging adult what one of their greatest fears is for their years ahead, the common answer is dementia.
Doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine are pioneering the use of primary targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) to prevent or reduce debilitating phantom limb and stump pain in amputees.
Despite claims that helmets do not protect the cervical spine during a motorcycle crash and may even increase the risk of injury, researchers from the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison found that, during an accident, helmet use lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particularly fractures of the cervical vertebrae. These findings appear in a new article published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, "Motorcycle helmets and cervical spine injuries: a 5-year experience at a Level 1 trauma center," written by Dr. Paul S. Page, Dr. Zhikui Wei, and Dr. Nathaniel P. Brooks.
A new study has revealed that chiropractic care is improving low-back pain among female veterans, according to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA). Female veterans are one of the fastest growing populations receiving treatment through the Veterans Administration (VA) health care system in the U.S.
McMaster University neuroscientists studying sports-related head injuries have found that it takes less than a full concussion to cause memory loss, possibly because even mild trauma can interrupt the production of new neurons in a region of the brain responsible for memory.
Many Canadians are not connected to their electronic health information. But this is not because there is a shortage of these records. You likely have multiple digital health files, some you may not be aware of, and many you may not have access to.
Even a minor surgery can prove to be high-risk and even fatal for frail patients, according to new research.
The last time you went to see a doctor, it was probably because you were in pain – it’s by far the main reason people access the health service. And if you did go because of pain, your doctor probably asked you to rate it on a scale from zero to ten. Zero being no pain and ten being the worst pain you can imagine. This pain scale is so simple and intuitive, that it’s hard to imagine a time when doctors didn’t have it.
Broken bones are a bigger deal the older you are: even after they've healed, the bones of older people are weaker and more likely to re-fracture. And since more than 6 million Americans break a bone each year, figuring out how to help people heal better would make a big difference.
Most patients are incompliant when it comes to following prescription exercises unless you can provide compelling reasons to do so.  As an example of incompliance, while most of us recognize that flossing will counteract and prevent gingivitis, those who are more concerned about the more immediate and potentially pressing issue of halitosis may floss more regularly.
In the first article of this series, a detailed discussion of the number one contributor to a pain syndrome was provided (the activity of local nociceptors with receptor fields on relevant dermatomal, myotomal and sclerotomal tissues) (April 2019).

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