Clinical

According to the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), pain is defined as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.”
These days, many chiropractors are adjusting patients suffering from the effects of overusing their various electronic devices. Everywhere we go, people are engaged with their phones. Some seem completely unable to put the device away.
Too often, chiropractors label a patient’s condition in a way that does not provide specific information about the nature of their dysfunction. Terms like bursitis, tennis elbow, jumpers knee  – even more general terms like low back pain, neck pain, and sciatica do little to define the nature of the injury.
Building on the concept of neuroreality, which explains how our experience of the world is not the reflection of an objective reality, but a construct of our brains built with intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli.
In my previous article (April 2018) I presented and discussed the concept of “neuroreality” as the most accurate science-based conceptual foundation available to approach the understanding of “pain with movement” disorders.
Three centuries ago, in 1710, the Irish philosopher George Berkeley proposed this famous thought experiment: “If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” He used this question to discuss his philosophy of “immaterialism,” which argued that perception creates reality and that nothing exists outside our minds.
If you ask an aging adult what one of their greatest fears is for their years ahead, the common answer is dementia.
Doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine are pioneering the use of primary targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) to prevent or reduce debilitating phantom limb and stump pain in amputees.
Despite claims that helmets do not protect the cervical spine during a motorcycle crash and may even increase the risk of injury, researchers from the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison found that, during an accident, helmet use lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particularly fractures of the cervical vertebrae. These findings appear in a new article published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, "Motorcycle helmets and cervical spine injuries: a 5-year experience at a Level 1 trauma center," written by Dr. Paul S. Page, Dr. Zhikui Wei, and Dr. Nathaniel P. Brooks.
A new study has revealed that chiropractic care is improving low-back pain among female veterans, according to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA). Female veterans are one of the fastest growing populations receiving treatment through the Veterans Administration (VA) health care system in the U.S.
McMaster University neuroscientists studying sports-related head injuries have found that it takes less than a full concussion to cause memory loss, possibly because even mild trauma can interrupt the production of new neurons in a region of the brain responsible for memory.
A new U.S. study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found no significant difference between opioids and non-opioid analgesics for treating arm or leg pain.
I was young and spring had sprung. Our back lane was finally clear of snow. It was time for a very first ride on my new birthday bike.
A six-week transition period did not help wearers adjust to "maximal" running shoes, indicating that increased impact forces and loading rates caused by the shoe design do not change over time, a new study from Oregon State University -- Cascades has found.
We are all familiar with repetitive stress injuries, whether it’s from overusing our smartphones or texting, and we’ve even made the trek to our medical practitioners seeking relief. But a new patient has been knocking on the doors of chiropractors and physiotherapists – gamers.
Neural glitches in the sleep-deprived brain can intensify and prolong the agony of sickness and injury, research finds.
Over the last 20 years, shockwave therapy (SWT) has evolved at an incredible pace.  Originally developed to treat kidney stones, SWT is a non-invasive alternative to surgery, and has been used to treat people of all ages, and multiple conditions.
Many people seek out chiropractors for the treatment of various musculoskeletal complaints, most notably lower back pain and neck pain.

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