Techniques
Since I started in chiropractic about 40 years ago, I have been troubled by the vertebral subluxation. It's not that I question whether subluxations exist.  The problem is that I can feel subluxations, but I don't understand what is going on and why they happen.
Throughout many years as a practising chiropractor, I have found myself frustrated with patients who have experienced long term back and leg pain, with no relief from my approach. I utilize various chiropractic techniques and include many mechanical and PEMF physical therapies that seemed to be beneficial in most spinal conditions, but not with the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis.
In part one of this series, I presented a general introduction to the complex topic of “pain with movement” disorders was provided with a detailed discussion of the first contributor to a pain syndrome, i.e. the activity of local nociceptors with receptor fields on dermatomal, myotomal and sclerotomal tissues. An important caveat was provided associated with this idea – the well-known neurofunctional fact that activity of local nociceptors does not necessarily require tissue damage.
According to the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), pain is defined as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.”
These days, many chiropractors are adjusting patients suffering from the effects of overusing their various electronic devices. Everywhere we go, people are engaged with their phones. Some seem completely unable to put the device away.
Too often, chiropractors label a patient’s condition in a way that does not provide specific information about the nature of their dysfunction. Terms like bursitis, tennis elbow, jumpers knee  – even more general terms like low back pain, neck pain, and sciatica do little to define the nature of the injury.
Building on the concept of neuroreality, which explains how our experience of the world is not the reflection of an objective reality, but a construct of our brains built with intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli.
In my previous article (April 2018) I presented and discussed the concept of “neuroreality” as the most accurate science-based conceptual foundation available to approach the understanding of “pain with movement” disorders.
Three centuries ago, in 1710, the Irish philosopher George Berkeley proposed this famous thought experiment: “If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” He used this question to discuss his philosophy of “immaterialism,” which argued that perception creates reality and that nothing exists outside our minds.
HAMILTON, Ont. – The type of needle used during a lumbar puncture makes a significant difference in the subsequent occurrence of headache, nerve irritation and hearing disturbance in patients, according to a study by Hamilton medical researchers.
LOMBARD, Ill. - Shoe orthotics alone or combined with chiropractic care can significantly improve low back pain experienced by millions of Americans, according to a new study conducted by National University of Health Sciences (NUHS).
Music therapy decreases pain in patients recovering from spine surgery, compared to a control group of patients who received standard postoperative care alone, according to results of a new study.
Many chiropractors treat recreational or amateur athletes. Often, they encounter patients that have injuries that stem from overuse or improper movement mechanics.
Scoliosis affects around three out of every 100 people. While most cases of scoliosis are mild, some children develop spine deformities that continue to get more severe as they grow. An especially severe spinal curve can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function properly.
Shock wave therapy (SWT) has been used in Canada for more than two decades. It is taught and has been part of the curriculum at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) for almost ten years. It has been so progressive and intuitive that the CMCC and other leading institutions such as McGill, Queens and Cleveland Clinic have instituted a multidisciplinary approach to incorporating SWT into their curriculum and treatment of multiple musculoskeletal conditions.
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