Health News
When most people think about opioid overdoses, it's typically a younger person that comes to mind. But it's often older Canadians who bear the brunt of detrimental effects related to the powerful narcotics.
Combined deaths from drug overdose and suicide ('self-injury') now outstrip those from diabetes in the US, reveals a brief report published online in the journal Injury Prevention.
Higher levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity improve all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events.
Do your knees ache? According to new findings from OMRF, your diet could be a culprit.
ARLINGTON, VA—American Chiropractic Association (ACA) President N. Ray Tuck, Jr., DC, released the following statement today in response to UnitedHealthcare’s decision to withdraw a recent policy that denied coverage of manipulative therapy for the treatment of headache:The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) has confirmed that UnitedHealthcare (UHC) has restored its policy in support of coverage for nondrug manipulative therapy for headache treatment. The change was posted online in a revised policy document for manipulative therapy dated Aug. 1.We appreciate that UHC weighed the evidence in support of manipulative therapy for headache that ACA provided in its July 23 letter to UHC President Dan Schumacher, and made the determination that patients should have access to this effective, nondrug treatment option.  ACA is especially grateful to the 40 national and state chiropractic organizations that amplified our message and joined with us in our work with UHC to achieve the best possible result on behalf of patients. BELOW IS THE ORIGINAL WEB POSTING (JULY 24TH)ARLINGTON, VA—The American Chiropractic Association (ACA), supported by chiropractic organizations across the country, strongly opposes a new policy by UnitedHealthcare (UHC) that denies headache sufferers the option to treat their pain without drugs using spinal manipulative therapy (SMT).In a letter to UHC President and CEO Dan Schumacher, ACA calls the policy--which denies coverage of SMT for headache treatment because it states it is "unproven and/or not medically necessary"--flawed because UHC failed to include key studies in an analysis conducted in advance of its determination."We urge UHC to withdraw its policy based on the most recent research, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines (including AHRQ), which support the use of spinal manipulation for the treatment of headache," writes ACA President N. Ray Tuck, Jr., DC.The letter is cosigned by the Congress of Chiropractic State Associations, the Clinical Compass (formerly known as the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters), the American Black Chiropractic Association and 24 state/regional chiropractic associations.Offering additional justification for the policy's withdrawal, ACA points to the "insufficient and inadequate" management of migraine and cervicogenic headache using drugs along with the relative safety of SMT compared to other treatments covered by UHC for headache. "Providing headache sufferers with viable alternatives for managing their condition is an important aspect of patient-centered care," the letter states.This was not the first time that UHC has tried to deny coverage of SMT for headache. In 2008, the company made a similar determination but later reversed its decision after reviewing evidence provided by ACA and others. ACA and its partners plan to oppose the current policy with equal vigor by reaching out not only to UHC but also potentially to employers and other stakeholders to share information regarding the serious issues raised by UHC's determination.ACA's letter adds, "The use of this flawed policy constitutes, in our view, a breach of fiduciary responsibility for a health plan administrator who must ensure that the plan claims are decided in accordance with plan documents and valid evidence."
To improve communication about pain between patients and physicians, a team led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC has developed a mobile application called "Painimation" that has the potential to assess and monitor pain better than any previously used measurement tools. Results of the clinical trial were published today in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.
UCLA bioengineers have demonstrated that a gel-like material containing tiny magnetic particles could be used to manage chronic pain from disease or injury. Broadly, the study demonstrates the promising use of biomechanical forces that push and pull on cells to treat disease.
A 64-year-old cancer patient is being lauded for using her obituary to make a final plea to stop so-called fat shaming by members of the medical profession.
Hamilton police have charged a chiropractor with sexual assault.
Inflammation is part of the body's natural healing process. But when it becomes chronic, inflammation can lead to cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. Inflammasomes -- protein-based molecular machines -- trigger inflammation in response to different signals generated by cell stress, tissue injury or infectious organisms.
Spinal cord injury or damage causes permanent changes in strength, sensation and other body functions. Hope of recuperation is slim to none. Now a new Tel Aviv University study finds the intravenous injection of a potent enzyme, just hours after an accident, has the potential to diminish a cascade of pathological events responsible for neuronal death, such as inflammation and scarring.
PHILADELPHIA – Patients who sought care for a sprained ankle in states that were found to be "high prescribers" of opioids were approximately three times more likely to receive a prescription for the drugs than those treated in "low-prescribing" states, according to new research.
OTTAWA—Federal officials overseeing billions in benefit payments to millions of Canadians are hoping artificial intelligence can resolve ongoing snags in the system.
A raised bit of concrete on a sidewalk. An icy patch on the road. A misstep on the stairs at home. All of these can lead to accidental falls – landing a person not only on the ground, but often also in hospital.
Why do people in Colorado exercise so much more than people in Mississippi?
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