Opinion
Many chiropractors are passionate and inspired individuals who often can’t hold back sharing the chiropractic story. That passion and energy however can sometimes affect how the message comes across. Instead of engaging them, patients end up being talked at or lectured to, which renders the message ineffective.
I’ve always found it unsettling how research performed in the lab does not accurately mirror the patient visit experience. Many researchers only study the treatment (ie. lumbar adjustment effectiveness for low back pain), while in actuality the visit experience is multidimentional and different in every office.
How many of you are missing exactly how a patient is presenting on their regular visits. I don’t mean the symptoms they are presenting with. I’m referring to where they are at emotionally. Are you fully and totally in tune with the tone in which they are projecting?  
I read the Canadian Chiropractor magazine every time it arrives in my office and usually start with the "from the editor" note inside of the front page. In the last issue it mentioned chiropractic utilization rates from "as little as three per cent to as high as 25 per cent". Having been in practice for thirty-five years, I have never seen the 25 percent but certainly believe in the three percent. Not entirely sure what that statistic relates to – whether it means that at some time in their life a person has gone to a chiropractor, or that they regularly see them on an ongoing basis for wellness care. There is a big difference. If a person has gone once or twice in their lifetime and qualifies as a statistic is different from the person that comes in on a regular basis for wellness care.
Funding home care and long-term care is fast becoming the main challenge of our outdated medicare system.The system was developed in the mid-20th century for a young population that mostly required acute care from hospitals and physicians. But that need is changing rapidly with our aging population.
“But what do you actually do?”
My experience early in my career and what I have heard from some of the chiropractors I’ve mentored have led me to believe that the associateship model of practice is flawed.  
Editor’s note: Founding editor Dr. Ian Horseman has written this guest editorial in honour of the magazine’s 20th anniversary. Regular column by the editor resumes in the next issue.
The world was shocked when news of the death of yet another legendary music icon broke last week. Prince, who was well known for hits like "Kiss" and "When Doves Cry," was found dead in his home in Minneapolis.
Wouldn’t you agree that many chiropractors believe that prevention of spinal problems is an important part of practice? Although this is a really noble idea, I have to admit that even I believe this is not creating the opportunities we need to service a greater part of the population.
Editor’s Note: In commemoration of Canadian Chiropractor’s 20th anniversary, we’re bringing back this well-loved column that forms part of this magazine’s history. We asked Dr. Marshall Deltoff to be part of our anniversary issue for old time’s sake.
VANCOUVER, B.C. / Troy Media/ – An unfortunate reality of Canadian health care is that long wait times that have characterized it for years have made us come to accept delayed treatment as the norm.
In October 2015, I wrote an article entitled, "Business is Life," which outlined the oversaturation of chiropractors in Ontario and some of the academic business deficiencies new graduates are facing once they leave chiropractic college.
Fifteen years ago my husband and I – with our one-year-old toddler in tow – immigrated to Canada, full of hope and anticipation for what we could bring to this country and what this country could offer us. Now with two teenage boys, who have their whole futures ahead of them, we are proud to call this country our home and its people, our people.
All across Canada provincial governments are grappling with ever growing healthcare demands in the face of shrinking resources. Our enviable publicly funded health system is now well into a downward spiral of unenviable disrepair. As patients are becoming more knowledgeable about their own care, and as doctors develop a wider array of options available to treat diseases, the costs are increasing.
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