Research
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are working to uncover ways to encourage the cells in and around the meniscus to repair themselves, hopefully leading to less invasive procedures. Scientists within the McKay Orthopaedic Research Laboratory are taking a tissue-engineering approach to improve many types of healing related to the skeletal system, says Lou Soslowsky, the vice-chair for research in the department of orthopaedic surgery. "We blend biology with engineering to understand normal and pathologic processes to ultimately replace or regenerate musculoskeletal tissues."
STUDY TITLE: Chiropractic Treatments for Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Narrative Review Based on the SOSORT Outcome CriteriaAUTHORS: Morningstar MW, Stitzel CJ, Siddiqui A et al.PUBLICATION INFORMATION: Journal of Chiropractic Medicine 2017; 16(1): 64-71
Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is widely treated by chiropractors. The common goals of treatment include correction or stabilization of the Cobb angle (i.e. curve severity) and/or to provide pain relief. It is uncertain whether the body of chiropractic literature fits the criteria for reporting of results as outlined by the 2015 Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT) and the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) consensus paper and Weiss et al.
COLUMBUS, Ohio – A new study from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center examines what may cause chronic back pain in runners and the exercises to help prevent it.
Muscle paralysis rapidly causes inflammation in nearby bone marrow, which may promote the formation of large cells that break down bone, a new study finds. The article is published in the American Journal of Physiology – Cell Physiology.
It is the number one reason that people go to see the doctor, and it is now a national crisis. The problem: chronic pain and prescription opioids. The dilemma: how to provide the most effective pain treatment for 80 per cent of pain patients who are at least risk for addiction while causing the least harm to the remaining 20 per cent who are at most risk. The solution: it's very complicated, but it may be possible to address both problems without adversely affecting either.
A new national survey for Canadian chiropractors will launch in January 2018 aimed at assessing the profession's use, opinion, skill and training on evidence-informed clinical practice, according to the Canadian Chiropractic Guideline Initiative (CCGI).
Research done in the podiatric field has shown the use of foot orthoses is effective for the relief of low-back pain and that back pain may be related to a disruption in the kinetic chain.
McMaster University in Hamilton and St. Joseph Healthcare Hamilton have teamed up to launch a new multidisciplinary research centre dedicated to cannabis research.
The majority of football players in the US (70 per cent) are elementary and middle school students. These young athletes enthusiastically put on their gear, learn strategy, acquire skills, and participate in games with their peers. Unfortunately, like their professional counterparts these athletes sometimes get injured. Fairly often they sustain head impacts during tackling and blocking maneuvers. Exposure to head impacts in American football has become a national concern: neurocognitive and brain changes can occur from repeated head impacts, even when no evidence of concussion is found.
Four out of six people with paralyzing spinal cord injuries who were treated with a new cell therapy have recovered two or more motor levels on at least one side, new study results show.
TORONTO – With hockey season now underway, here's something for fans to take to heart: a new study suggests the excitement of watching one's favourite team, either live or on TV, can have a profound effect on the cardiovascular system, in some cases even doubling the heart rate.
It has long been thought that rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases were centered in the joint cartilage.
BOSTON – A new biomarker (CCL11) for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been discovered that may allow the disease to be diagnosed during life for the first time, according to findings from a study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the VA Boston Healthcare System (VABHS).
The brain plays an active and essential role much earlier than previously thought, according to new research from Tufts University scientists in Medford/Somerville, Mass., which shows that long before movement or other behaviors occur, the brain of an embryonic frog influences muscle and nerve development and protects the embryo from agents that cause developmental defects.

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