Research
Doctors of chiropractic serve approximately 10 per cent of the Canadian population annually, with the aim to improve the health and well-being of Canadians, primarily with musculoskeletal disorders. Despite available evidence for optimal management of these disorders, poor adherence to guidelines and wide variations in service delivery by clinicians have been noted across health-care disciplines, including chiropractic.
A new study found that eating less fiber, more saturated fat and more sugar is associated with lighter, less restorative, and more disrupted sleep.
Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found.
Despite the health-enhancing benefits of physical activity, this alone may not be enough to reduce the risk of disease and illness. Population-based studies found more than half of an average person’s working day involves sedentary activities associated with prolonged sitting. 
PHILADELPHIA – Physicians and others now recognize that seemingly mild, concussion-type head injuries lead to long-term cognitive impairments surprisingly often. A brain protein called SNTF, which rises in the blood after some concussions, signals the type of brain damage that is thought to be the source of these cognitive impairments, according to a study led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Glasgow in Glasgow, U.K.
WINNIPEG – Researchers at the University of Manitoba are giving thanks for a popular fund-raising craze that led everyone from little kids to big-time celebrities to get buckets of ice dumped on their heads.
HALIFAX – In a lab at Dalhousie University's medical school, a few twitches of a mouse's leg represent a big step forward for research into motor neuron disease.
Scientists at The University of Manchester have shown for the first time that the numbers of opiate receptors in the brain increases to combat severe pain in arthritis sufferers.
Some six million people in the U.S. suffer from scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine. These include approximately two to three per cent of adolescents who are diagnosed each year with idiopathic scoliosis, which is usually identified during puberty and progresses until skeletal maturity. One in 500 children today require treatment using spine braces and one in 5,000 need spinal surgery.
Here's an easy way for office workers to burn a few extra calories and avoid the perils of sitting all day: stand and type.
That sense of well-being, freedom and extra energy that runners often experience is not just a matter of endorphins. A study at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) shows that the "runner's high" phenomenon is also caused by dopamine, an important neurotransmitter for motivation.
Studies of asymptomatic individuals with no lifetime history of low back pain (LBP) have indicated that 40 to 70 per cent report clinically significant LBP after a two-hour standing protocol. This induced (but transient) LBP paradigm has allowed characterization of neuromuscular differences between individuals who develop LBP when standing compared with those who do not.
The Canadian Chiropractic Guideline Initiative (CCGI) is ramping up efforts to deliver evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and best practice recommendations to chiropractors across the country.
The Institute for Work and Health (IWH) is now accepting abstracts for presentation proposals for the 19th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (Premus 2016).
A new study suggests children with multiple sclerosis (MS) who exercise regularly may have a less active disease. The research is published in the August 12, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.